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Tobacco Control is an international peer review journal covering the nature and consequences of tobacco use worldwide; tobacco's effects on population health, the economy, the environment, and society; efforts to prevent and control the global tobacco epidemic through population level education and policy changes; the ethical dimensions of tobacco control policies; and the activities of the tobacco industry and its allies. Essential reading for everyone with an interest in tobacco control, including public health professionals, researchers, policy makers and educators.

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To celebrate the 17th World Conference on Tobacco or Health taking place in Cape Town, South Africa, 7-9 March, the March issue of Tobacco Control will be free to access for a month. Please explore the latest research and comment from the frontline of international tobacco policy.

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Tobacco Control accepts submissions of a wide range of article types, including research papers, review articles and industry watch articles.
The Author Information section provides specific article requirements to help you turn your research into an article suitable for Tobacco Control.
Information is also provided on editorial policies and open access.

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Reassessing the importance of ‘lost pleasure’ associated with smoking cessation: implications for social welfare and policy

To cite: Tobacco Control. Published Online First: 28 November 2017. doi: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2017-053734
Read the full article here: link
Introduction: Benefit–cost analyses of tobacco regulations include estimates of the informed choice of smokers to continue smoking. Few studies have focused on subjective feelings associated with continued smoking. This study estimates how smoker discontent and regret relate to risk perceptions and health concerns.
Conclusion: The proportion of smokers who might be characterised as having a preference to continue smoking are greatly outnumbered by addicted, discontent and concerned smokers who want to quit and regret ever having started to smoke. These discontent smokers could have a substantial net welfare gain if new regulations helped them escape their concerns about the health effects from continuing smoking.