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Secondhand smoke in cars: assessing children's potential exposure during typical journey conditions
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  • Published on:
    Response to "Indoor exposure limits?"
    • Sean Semple
    • Other Contributors:
      • Mr. Andrew Apsley, Dr Karen Galea, Dr Laura MacCalman, Mrs Brenda Friel, Ms Vicki Snelgrove

    Dear Editor,

    We are grateful that the eLetter from Ms Cunnison provides an opportunity for us to clarify some aspects of our work [1].

    In the past there has been no authoritative guidance on the protection of public health from risks from particulate matter (PM) in indoor air. It is therefore a welcome development that the recent WHO Air Quality Guidelines for Indoor Air [2] concluded that there is no...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Indoor exposure limits?
    I am a lay person, but curious as to how these conclusions are reached. How is it possible to describe 25 ug/m3 as a WHO _indoor_ air quality standard, when it seems to have been designed as an outdoor standard? More importantly how is it possible to apply the standard to journeys lasting under half an hour, when the standard specifically directs how to deal with short exposure times (http://www.epa.gov/ttn/caaa/t1/memoranda/pmf...
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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.