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An intervention to reduce the number of convenience stores selling tobacco: feasibility study
  1. Janine Paynter1,
  2. Marewa Glover2,
  3. Chris Bullen3,
  4. Deepika Sonia2
  1. 1Social and Community Health, School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  2. 2Centre for Tobacco Control Research, School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  3. 3National Institute for Health Innovation, School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  1. Correspondence to Dr Janine Paynter, Social and Community Health, School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand; j.paynter{at}auckland.ac.nz

Abstract

Background Reduction of the availability of tobacco has been proposed as a means of reducing and denormalising tobacco use. Some retailers have stopped selling tobacco. Therefore, we investigated how willing New Zealand convenience store owners were to stop selling tobacco or sell nicotine replacement therapy. Promotion of their stores was offered as an incentive to stop selling tobacco.

Methods We asked convenience store owners in the Auckland metropolitan region of New Zealand to choose one of three actions. The first was to stop selling tobacco for a short period of time; the second was to restrict the hours that they sold tobacco; the third was to display and sell nicotine replacement therapy. All participating retailers completed a short interview about selling tobacco. We also surveyed customers about nicotine replacement and cessation.

Results One-third of eligible retailers agreed to participate. Most who participated (93%) were unwilling to stop or restrict tobacco sales and 2 (7%) had already stopped selling tobacco. Tobacco was perceived as a key product for their businesses. Very few customers who purchased cigarettes noticed nicotine replacement therapy or obtained it from convenience stores.

Conclusions Substantially reducing the availability of tobacco in communities is likely to require legislative approaches, underpinned by sustained community pressure and support for convenience store owners who are willing to change their business model.

  • Advertising and Promotion
  • Denormalization
  • Prevention
  • Public policy
  • Cessation
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