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Population prevalence and predictors of self-reported exposure to court-ordered, tobacco-related corrective statements
  1. Kelly D Blake1,
  2. Gordon Willis2,
  3. Annette Kaufman2
  1. 1Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
  2. 2Tobacco Control Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Kelly D Blake, Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-9671, USA; kelly.blake{at}nih.gov

Abstract

Objective To describe the population prevalence and predictors of self-reported exposure to court-ordered tobacco-related corrective statements in 2017–2018, when they were first implemented in newspapers and on television.

Methods Nationally representative data from the 2018 Health Information National Trends Survey were used (n=3504). Frequencies and weighted proportions were calculated for seeing any corrective statement and for each of the five court-ordered corrective statements. Weighted, multivariable logistic regression was used to examine sociodemographic and smoking status predictors of reported exposure to any corrective statement.

Results In 2018, an estimated 40.6% of US adults had seen messages in newspapers or on television in the past 6 months stating that a federal court has ordered tobacco companies to make statements about the dangers of smoking cigarettes. Reported exposure to topic-specific statements ranged from 11.4% (manipulation of cigarette design) to 34.7% (health effects). Those with a high school education were significantly less likely than those with a college degree to report seeing the statements (OR=0.69, CI 0.50 to 0.95) and current smokers were significantly more likely than never smokers to report seeing them (OR=1.68, CI 1.12 to 2.53).

Conclusions In the first 6 months of corrective statement implementation, an estimated 40.6% of US adults reported at least one exposure to any corrective statement, and current smokers were more likely than never smokers to report exposure. Traditional media channels can be effective for tobacco-related message dissemination; however, they may fail to reach more than half of the adult population without additional targeted communication efforts.

  • Tobacco industry
  • Media
  • Litigation
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Footnotes

  • Contributors KDB: conceived of study, developed survey items, developed analytic plan, interpreted data, drafted manuscript and revisions. GW and AK: developed survey items, interpreted data, contributed to manuscript and revisions.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors. The work was done as part of their duties as Federal employees of the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI). HINTS V was funded by NCI via contract to Westat (HHSN2612012000028I).

  • Disclaimer The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. government. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and may not necessarily represent NIH positions or policies.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval HINTS V was reviewed by the NIH Office of Human Subjects Research and given a non-human subjects determination via exemption #13204 on April 25, 2016. HINTS V received an expedited approval from the Westat IRB on March 28, 2016.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement Data are available in a public, open access repository.

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