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Carbon monoxide concentration in mainstream E-cigarette emissions measured with diode laser spectroscopy
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  • Published on:
    Carbon Monoxide to be expected with combustion
    • Thomas B. Kirsop, Power/Stationary Engineer (Industrial Boiler Operator) - CEO Alternatives & Options - Vapourizers and E-Liquids Ltd (Alberta) Vaping Industry Trade Association (VITA) of Canada

    NOT PEER REVIEWED

    It should be noted that the Aspire Cleito coils used in this study have a manufacturer stated operating power range of between 55 and 75 watts. This is noted both on the box and laser etched into the side of the coil housing proper. it should be noted that the first data points in the graph ( to demonstrate the presence of CO in both liquid samples are in excess of the stated power range of the element.

    "Strawnana" at 80 watts
    "Black Ice" at 100 watts

    This leads me to question the normalizing curve for the black ice sample as there are no data points in the graph (Figure 2) within the manufacturer noted operating range for that coil.

    Furthermore, while this statement " ...though the bulk liquid temperature is controlled by boiling limits of the e-liquid component" would be accurate were the coil to be completely submerged in liquid, the mechanics of coil design will confound that principle. The resistance coils in electronic cigarettes are not, by design, submerged in liquid, they are in contact with a liquid saturated wick. Any heat energy applied to the coil whether in magnitude or duration, that exceeds the supply of liquid saturating the wick will result in a temperature spike which could cause the temperature to spike causing thermal degradation of what liquid does remain, and the singeing of the cotton wick.

    It can be expected that where combustion occurs, carbon compounds will...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    Author is the CEO and 50% Shareholder of Alternatives & Options - Vapourizers and E-liquids Ltd.. A privately held corporation with two retail outlets selling vapour technology products to Canadian adult smokers.

    Author is on the board of directors for the Vaping Industry Trade Association (VITA) of Canada.
  • Published on:
    Irresponsible methodology

    NOT PEER REVIEWED

    The atomizer used for testing has a maximum rating of 80 watts.
    200 watts was applied. Needless to say, horrible results occurred.
    This is not reputable science, it is a failed experiment, it should never have been published.

    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.