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Demand for tobacco products in Bangladesh
  1. Nasiruddin Ahmed1,
  2. Tanvir Ahmed Mozumder1,
  3. Md. Tariq Hassan2,
  4. Rumana Huque3
  1. 1Economics, BRAC Institute of Governance and Development (BIGD), Brac University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
  2. 2VAT Policy, National Board of Revenue (NBR) Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh
  3. 3Economics, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh
  1. Correspondence to Dr Nasiruddin Ahmed, BRAC Institute of Governance and development (BIGD), Brac University, Dhaka-1212, Bangladesh; ahmed.nasiruddin{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Background Tobacco tax increase is considered as one of the most effective means to reduce tobacco consumption and its consequences. An increase in taxes, which results in an increase in the price of tobacco products, reduces consumption. Historically, a number of studies estimated the responsiveness of quantity demanded to a change in price—the price elasticity of demand—of tobacco products in Bangladesh. However, the government’s stronger commitment to reducing tobacco use, rising standard of living, rapidly changing cultural norms due to globalisation, and the substantial fall in tobacco use seen in GATS 2017 necessitate an updated measure of price elasticity of tobacco use, which will allow for more accurate answers to questions of tobacco tax policy in the country. This study endeavours to fill this gap in the literature on demand for tobacco products in Bangladesh.

Objective To estimate the price elasticity of demand for tobacco products, namely cigarettes, biris and smokeless tobacco (SLT) products with the 2016 household income and expenditure survey data in Bangladesh.

Methods We used the Deaton model (1997) to estimate the price elasticities of demand for tobacco products using the Household Income and Expenditure Survey (HIES) 2016 dataset of the Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics. The HIES 2016 surveyed 46 076 households spread over 2304 primary sampling units across the country. We have calculated own price elasticities of demand for tobacco products by expenditure groups and by regions (rural and urban).

Results The estimates of own-price elasticity of demand for cigarette, biri and SLT products are −1.03, −1.34 and −0.30, respectively. The results show that rural households are more responsive to changes in the prices of cigarettes than urban households. Households with low expenditure are found to be more responsive to changes in the price of cigarettes than the households with high expenditure. This suggests that increases in cigarette prices at the lower end would effectively reduce cigarette consumption among the people having low expenditure and improve health equity.

Conclusions Our results suggest that the demand for smoking tobacco products is responsive to price changes. Therefore, substantial increase in the prices of tobacco products through taxation will result in significant reduction in tobacco use, particularly among the low expenditure households, while increasing government revenue.

  • tobacco industry
  • taxation
  • public policy

Data availability statement

Data are available in a public, open access repository. We have used Household Income & Expenditure (HIES) 2016 data. To get access to this dataset, one needs to purchase these data from Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (BBS)

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Data availability statement

Data are available in a public, open access repository. We have used Household Income & Expenditure (HIES) 2016 data. To get access to this dataset, one needs to purchase these data from Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (BBS)

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Footnotes

  • Contributors NA, MTH and TAM contributed to the study design, estimated elasticities and wrote the paper while RH contributed to updating the manuscript.

  • Funding This paper is funded by the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Institute for Health Research and Policy through its partnership with Bloomberg Philanthropies.

  • Disclaimer The authors alone are responsible for the views expressed in this article, and they do not necessarily represent he views, decisions or policies of the institutions with which they are affiliated.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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