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Exposure of 4-year to 24-year olds to tobacco imagery on prime-time Chilean television
  1. Armando Peruga1,2,3,
  2. Oscar Urrejola1,4,
  3. Iris Delgado1,
  4. Isabel Matute1,
  5. Carla Castillo-Laborde1,
  6. Xaviera Molina1,
  7. Macarena Hirmas1,
  8. Andrea Olea1,
  9. Claudia González1,
  10. Ximena Aguilera1,
  11. James D Sargent5,6
  1. 1Centro de Epidemiología y Políticas de Salud, Universidad del Desarrollo Facultad de Medicina Clínica Alemana, Las Condes, Chile
  2. 2Tobacco Control Research Group, IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain
  3. 3Consorcio de Investigación Biomédica en Enfermedades Respiratorias-CIBERES, Madrid, Spain
  4. 4Subdirección de investigación, Teletón, Santiago, Chile
  5. 5C Everett Koop Institute, Geisel School of Medicine, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA
  6. 6The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice, Dartmouth College Geisel School of Medicine, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Armando Peruga, Centro de Epidemiología y Políticas de Salud, Universidad del Desarrollo Facultad de Medicina Clínica Alemana, Las Condes, Chile; aperuga{at}udd.cl

Abstract

Introduction The extent of the population’s exposure to tobacco imagery across all genres of regular TV programming and the contribution of each of these genres is unknown, except for UK broadcast channels. The objective of this study is to estimate the exposure of young people to tobacco imagery on Chilean prime-time television and the programme source contributing to such exposure.

Methods Programmes aired during 3 weeks in 2019 from the 15 highest audience channels in Chile were content-analysed for the occurrence of tobacco categorised as actual use, implied use, tobacco paraphernalia, tobacco brand appearances and whether they violated Chilean smoke-free law for each 1 min interval (92 639). The exposure of young people to tobacco content was estimated using media viewership figures.

Results Young people received 29, 11 and 4 million tobacco impressions of any type, explicit use and smoke-free violation, respectively, at a rate of 21.8, 8.0 and 2.1 thousand impressions per hour of TV viewing. The main sources of exposure to tobacco impressions were feature films and animated productions, which were almost entirely non-Chilean. Finally, young people were exposed to tobacco brand impressions primarily through films, effectively circumventing the advertising ban in Chile.

Discussion Television programming is a source of significant youth exposure to tobacco imagery, including branding impressions. To conform to the WHO FCTC, Chile should prohibit tobacco branding in any TV programme and require strong anti-tobacco advertisements prior to any TV programme portraying tobacco.

  • advertising and promotion
  • media
  • public policy
  • prevention

Data availability statement

Data are available on reasonable request. Data are available on request from the Centro de Epidemiología y Políticas de Salud of the Universidad del Desarrollo 3 years after the end of data collection (June 2019).

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Data availability statement

Data are available on reasonable request. Data are available on request from the Centro de Epidemiología y Políticas de Salud of the Universidad del Desarrollo 3 years after the end of data collection (June 2019).

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @armi0156, @ximenaguilera

  • Contributors AP designed the study. AP and JS led the writing of the manuscript. OU, XM, CC and IM supervised the survey design and implementation and contributed to data analysis and writing of the manuscript. ID and IM undertook the data analysis and contributed to the preparation of the manuscript. MH, AO, CG and XM contributed to the writing of the manuscript. All authors contributed to the revision of the manuscript.

  • Funding The National Research and Development Agency of Chile (ANID) funded this research under grant #SA18I0024.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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