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National longitudinal tobacco product cessation rates among US adults from the PATH Study: 2013–2019 (waves 1–5)
  1. Karin A Kasza1,
  2. Zhiqun Tang2,
  3. Haijun Xiao3,
  4. Daniela Marshall4,5,
  5. Cassandra Stanton2,
  6. Amy L Gross3,
  7. Kathy M Jackson3,
  8. Dannielle Kelley3,
  9. Megan J Schroeder3,
  10. Juan C Vivar3,
  11. Andrew Hyland1
  1. 1Department of Health Behavior, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, New York, USA
  2. 2Behavioral Health and Health Policy Practice, Westat Inc, Rockville, Maryland, USA
  3. 3Center for Tobacco Products, US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA
  4. 4National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
  5. 5Axle Informatics, Rockville, MD, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Karin A Kasza, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY 14203, USA; karin.kasza{at}roswellpark.org

Abstract

Objective To report on longitudinal tobacco product cessation rates, by product type, among adults (ages 18+ years) in the USA between 2013 and 2019.

Methods The Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study, a nationally representative, longitudinal cohort study was used to report on annual and biennial rates of the following three cessation behaviours across 2013–2019: (1) discontinuing tobacco product use (ie, transition from past 30-day use to no past 30-day use), (2) attempting to quit tobacco product use and (3) quitting tobacco product use among those who attempted to quit. Each cessation behaviour was evaluated separately for cigarettes, electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), cigars, hookah and smokeless tobacco. Generalised estimating equations were used to evaluate linear and nonlinear trends in cessation rates across the study period.

Results Between 2013 and 2019, rates of discontinuing cigarette smoking among adults in the USA statistically increased from 16% to 18%, though these were consistently lower than rates of discontinuing use of other tobacco products. Similarly, quit attempt rates and rates of quitting among attempters increased for cigarette smokers. However, rates of discontinuing ENDS use sharply declined across the study period, from 62% to 44%.

Conclusions Findings show that tobacco product cessation rates have been changing in recent years in the USA alongside the changing tobacco product marketplace and regulatory environment, though rates of discontinuing cigarette smoking remain relatively low. Findings can serve as a benchmark against which future cessation rates can be compared with evaluate the impacts of future tobacco regulatory policies.

  • Cessation
  • Surveillance and monitoring
  • Public policy
  • Electronic nicotine delivery devices

Data availability statement

Data may be obtained from a third party and are not publicly available. Data from the PATH Study wave 1 to wave 5 may be obtained from a third party and are not publicly available (https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NAHDAP/studies/36231). Application instructions and conditions of use are available at the website previously mentioned.

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Data availability statement

Data may be obtained from a third party and are not publicly available. Data from the PATH Study wave 1 to wave 5 may be obtained from a third party and are not publicly available (https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NAHDAP/studies/36231). Application instructions and conditions of use are available at the website previously mentioned.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors Contributors: KAK, ZT and AH led the conceptual design of the work. KAK drafted the initial manuscript, and all authors critically revised it. ZT conducted the statistical analysis, and all authors contributed to interpretation of results. All authors approved the work for journal publication and agree to be accountable for all aspects of the work. KAK is the guarantor of the work.

  • Funding This manuscript is supported with Federal funds from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health and the Center for Tobacco Products, Food and Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services, under contract to Westat (Contract Nos. HHSN271201100027C and HHSN271201600001C).

  • Disclaimer Representatives from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the US Food and Drug Administration contributed to the interpretation of the data and participated in the preparation, review and approval of the manuscript. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the US Department of Health and Human Services or any of its affiliated institutions or agencies.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.