eLetters

499 e-Letters

  • Re: RE: Does Snus use have a harm reduction effect in Sweden?
    Jonathan Foulds

    Dr Gupta’s letter suggests that the reduction in lung cancer in both Sweden and Connecticut is highly likely to be due to a reduction in smoking in both places. This is entirely unsurprising, and as far as Sweden is concerned is precisely what we suggested in the original paper he referred to:

    “There has been a larger drop in male daily smoking (from 40% in 1976 to 15% in 2002) than female daily smoking (34% in...

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  • RE: Does Snus use have a harm reduction effect in Sweden?
    Coral E Gartner

    Dr Gupta’s comparison of trends in lung cancer mortality and smoking prevalence in Sweden and Connecticut purports to undermine the claim that increasing snus use in Sweden has contributed to declining lung cancer rates there.

    Dr Gupta argues that some factor other than snus must have been at work because the ratio of lung cancers between Sweden and Connecticut has remained constant despite the large differenc...

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  • Does Snus use have a harm reduction effect in Sweden?
    Prakash C Gupta

    Dear Editor

    Some tobacco control community members believe that advocating the use of snus, a form of Swedish smokeless tobacco said to be less harmful than cigarettes, would prove an effective harm reduction strategy against tobacco related diseases. One important basis for such a claim is the fact that snus is widely used in Sweden (23% men used snus daily in 2002), where the incidence of cancer caused by tob...

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  • Re: Reduction increases quitting
    Kjell Bjartveit

    Reduction as a permanent solution may give people false expectations Thanks to Dr. John R Hughes for his interesting remarks of 20 January 2007 to our article (TC 15:472-480). We have the following comments: 1. Dr. Hughes states that our main finding (no health benefit from reducing cigarettes) has not been found in the few prior prospective studies of this topic. This is not correct. Based on a large study population in C...

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  • Reduction increases quitting
    John R Hughes

    The recent study by Tverdal and Bjartveit (TC 15:472-480, 2006) that found no health benefit from reducing cigarettes had several assets not found in the few prior prospective studies of this topic; e.g. the reducers had reduced by over 50% and several outcomes were measured.

    I would, however, like to make two comments. First, one asset of the study was the examination of "sustained reducers;" i.e., those who...

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  • Correction
    Simon Chapman

    My attention has been drawn to an error in our paper. At reference #3 we state that Addisson Yeaman was legal counsel to Philip Morris. He was in fact legal counsel to Brown & Williamson. The mistake arose because the document was in the Philip Morris collection and was misinterpreted as being a Philip Morris document. Also, it dates from 1963, not 1964 as stated.

  • Experience/performance may impose a duty to ignore pharmacology
    John R. Polito
    A legal duty to ignore cessation pharmacology

    After nearly two-fold efficacy over placebo in most clinical studies, NRT has proven no more effective than quitting without it in all real-world quitting surveys conducted since adoption of the June 2000 Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG): Minnesota 2002, California 2003, London 2003, Quebec 2004, Maryland 2005, UK NHS 2006, and Australia 2006.[...

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  • Re: Legal Reasoning in Malpractice Article is Sound, and the Threat Should Be Taken Seriously
    John F. Banzhaf III

    As the public interest attorney and law professor who first developed the concept of using legal action as a weapon against the problem of smoking (e.g., getting antismoking messages on TV and radio, driving cigarette commercials off the air, starting the nonsmokers’ rights movement, etc.), I was delighted to read a paper suggesting the feasibility of using legal action to more effectively prod physicians to warn patient...

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  • Legal Reasoning in Malpractice Article is Not Sound
    Michael B. Siegel

    I find the argument provided in the paper to be non-compelling because it fails to provide any reasonable argument for how the 3rd showing in a medical malpractice case - that there is a causal relationship between the breach of duty and the incurred injury - could possibly be met in a smoking malpractice case. This would require proving to the jury that the physician's failure to warn the patient to quit smoking was th...

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  • 'Smoking is addictive"
    Norbert Hirschhorn

    The paper by Henningfield, Rose and Zeller is an important contribution to understanding the all-too-clever manipulation of language by tobacco industry in defending its manufacture and marketing of an addictive product. It is useful to note, as on the authors' Table 1, that while the industry now publicly acknowldeges that cigarette smoking is addictive, it never mentions nicotine as the principal addictive agent. The...

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  • Errors in Table 1
    Michael J. Thun

    Table 1 contains two errors. The observed death rate from all cancers combined among women in 1991 was 175.3 per 100,000 in 1991 (not 173.3). The percentage decrease in the death rate from 1991 to 2003 was 8.4%. We noted and corrected both errors in the galleys but the corrections were not picked up by the copy editor.

  • Reduction as Prelude to Cessation
    John R Hughes

    The recent article by Gilpin, et al.,[1] reported the major initial impact of California’s tobacco control efforts was to initially reduce cigs/day among continuing smokers and this was followed by an increase in quitting.[1] We would like to make three comments on this paper.

    First, this study was one of the first to decompose the effects of tobacco control into effects on initiation, cessation and reducti...

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  • US moist snuff consumption is increasing even if aggregate smokeless tobacco is declining
    Jonathan Fell

    Care is needed when using aggregate smokeless tobacco (SLT) consumption data to examine the potential for SLT being used as a potential reduced exposure product. As far as I am aware very few people, if any, are suggesting that traditional chewing tobacco be used as an aid to smoking cessation; any hopes in this area have been focused on moist smokeless tobacco (MST).

    Data from the US Alcohol and Tobacco Tax an...

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  • CORRECTION
    FOUAD A. AL-BELASY

    The eletter entitled "A Personal Experience with Goza and Shisha Smoking is authored by only FOUAD A. Al-BELASY. The names of other co- workers were mistakenly entered during submission from below the bar displaying how to enter other colleagues.

  • Shisha, Goza, Hashish and Street Children: What the Egyptian Scene Teaches Us
    Kamal Chaouachi

    Shisha, Goza, Hashish and Street Children: What the Egyptian Scene Teaches Us

    For historical, sociocultural and health reasons, Egypt is cer...

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  • Shisha vs. “Water-pipe” : The Question of a Unifying Term
    Kamal Chaouachi

     

    Shisha vs. “Water-pipe” : The Question of a Unifying Term

    ...
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  • The Issue of Nomenclature: In Reply
    FOUAD A. AL-BELASY

    Dear Editor,

    This is to comment on the following recently published eletter:

    The issue of nomenclature: Wasim Maziak (17 June 2006)

    In a dictionary search for Hookah, Hubble-bubble, Narghile, Arghile, Water-pipe and Shisha, the Oxford Paperback Dictionary [1] defines Hookah as an oriental tobacco pipe with a long tube passing through a glass container that cools the smoke as it is drawn thr...

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  • The issue of nomenclature
    Wasim Maziak

    I thank the authors of letters regarding our published work (Ward et al, 2006) on their useful remarks. It is self-understandable that no one uses the world waterpipe when asking the public about this tobacco use method, but use the local word for it. The same way that we never ask the public about ischemic heart disease but use this term extensively in research papers about this problem. It is also understandable that t...

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  • A Commentary on Two Conclusions
    FOUAD A. AL-BELASY

    Dear Editor,

    This is to comment on the following recently published eletter:

    Chaouachi K: Syria, Lebanon, Tobacco Research in General and Narghile (Hookah, Shisha) Smoking in Particular. TC Online 8 June 2006.

    I completely agree with the statement that Shisha is now used internationally because of the global hookah craze whereas “waterpipe” is no hypostasis and adhere to the notice that this wo...

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  • A Personal Experience with Goza and Shisha Smoking
    Fouad A. Al-Belasy

    Being a son of a famous well-qualified owner of a café shop, I have been, since the early days of my perception, in direct contact with Goza and Shisha smokers. Goza is a modified form of Shisha. It has its head, body, water-container, and hose [1]. However, Goza has no mouth-piece separated from the hose and no disposable plastic mouth-piece is served or commonly used. Yet, the water-container of Goza was and still is ma...

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  • Syria, Lebanon, Tobacco Research in General and Narghile (Hookah, Shisha) Smoking in Particular
    Kamal Chaouachi

    Dear Editor,

    This is to comment on the following recently published study:...

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  • To All Those Who Read This-
    Jennifer A. Jacobs

    When I was 16-years, I lived a very rough life and found myself in the foster-care pool. I came to live with Gloria and Bill Tuttle, and stayed for a few months. I was a very disturbed and distraught child, and I did not get along well with Gloria at all. (In hindsight it wasn't because she was mean, it was because she was in charge!!!) Bill was another story all together. He was quiet. Almost serene. He was tired a lot...

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  • Erectile Dysfunction Medication
    Norbert Hirschhorn

    Would sildenafil (Viagra) or tadanafil (Cialis) ameliorate ED in men who smoke? Was use of these medications asked about in the study?

    Norbert Hirschhorn MD

  • The Social Context of Individual and Collective Smoking: Similarities and Differences
    Kamal Chaouachi

    Dear Editor,

    Studying the social context of cigarette smoking was acknowledged as a pressing need in tobacco control. However, with new emerging health concerns like the growing use of the hookah (narghile) in the world, the social context, which bear similarities in both individual and collective smoking, also shows great differences that need to be reviewed. This letter introduces the reader to the specificit...

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  • A Safer Cigarette
    Henry Jones

    Less Harmful cigarettes do exist, but the majority of the smoking public is unaware that they are available. Isn't it about time that our government establish an agency that would regulate all tobacco products? I have recently been made aware of a new company that makes a less harmful cigarette. The companies name is Wellstone Filters(lowertar.com), and they have a developed a special cigarette filter that is patented and...

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  • Scientific buffoonery
    Kevin M. Mulvina

    It would have to be seen as the most intriguing question of our era; to understand how, with all the most educated of scholarly voices abdicating for world wide smoking bans, how not one of those participants has the vision to see outside the box. To understand with very little imagination how beneficial it could be to society as a whole to simply look at the product before punishing it’s victims. When we view tobacco a...

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  • A CALL TO ACTION
    VICTOR O KOLADE

    I read the article by Offen et al with great interest. It is an excellent elucidation of the concepts of ‘boycott,’ ‘buycott,’ and ‘perimetric.’ One opportunity for perimetric action not mentioned is the option each academic has to boycott and/or draw attention to universities and medical schools that accept tobacco industry funds or hold tobacco stock. (1) The converse is equally appropriate; ‘buycott’ centers that hav...

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  • Re: Courtrooom expert opinions should be published
    Frederic Grannis

    The trial testimony of Sanford Barsky, offered by David Egilman in his email letter to Tobacco Control, provides an illustrative example of why tobacco industry sponsored research should not be published in Tobacco Control or other responsible scientific periodicals. In the testimony Barsky argues for non-tobacco causation of a case of squamous cancer of the lung. Examination of tobacco industry documents housed in the...

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  • "Harm reduction?" seduction
    Stephen L. Hansen,MD

    While I'm delighted that these tobacco industry trial products of unproven merit continue to "taste like s__t" (-a reference to the RJR president's famous quote in "Barbarians at the Gate"), I hope that we'll not see much more of OSH's time spent on what amounts mostly to market research valuable to the tobacco malefactors.

  • Hookah or water pipe ?
    Mostafa K. Mohamed

    I certainly agree with most of the comments of Dr Kamal Chaouachi but the need to develop one generic name for the different types of this form of tobacco smoking is definite and we tend to prefer the term water- pipe smoking as it denotes the similarity that links all these forms and shapes and local names. Certainly these different names are associated with local geographical languages and idenified best in the reps...

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  • Some Misconceptions in a Good Alert Paper
    Kamal Chaouachi

    Dear Editor,

    We wish to draw your attention to some misconceptions in the following study:

    Rima AFIFI SOWEID. Lebanon: water pipe line to youth. Tobacco Control 2005;14:363-4.

    >"In Lebanon, youth and women are the target of a marketing campaign featuring a new tobacco product for use with the more traditional water pipe."

    The caption for the embedded picture is a an erroneous int...

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  • Response to Impact vs. Efficacy for Pregnant Smokers
    Paul Aveyard

    Prochaska and Velicer have commented on this trial(1), and, having been alerted to this comment elsewhere, we feel we need to respond belatedly. They suggest the study had important flaws but do not name them. We drew attention to those flaws in the conduct of the study in the report. The major flaw was that midwives in the control arm were less enthused about the intervention and complied with the protocol less well,...

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  • Courtrooom expert opinions should be published
    David Egilman

    As Professor Chapman has noted some have questioned the merits of publishing papers that the tobacco industry funded. In the spirit of Justice Brandeis who noted that, “Sunlight is the best disinfectant” I believe that more not fewer tobacco industry consultants opinions should see the light of day. For example I believe that court room opinions offered under oath, by tobacco hired historians, physicians and others sho...

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  • Funding Source
    Simon Chapman

    A reader has enquired about the funding source for this study. It was the the National Cancer Institute of the US National Institutes of Health. SC- Editor

  • A major contribution to TDR methodology
    Heikki T Hiilamo

    I would like to propose some additions to Carter’s excellent review paper on Tobacco document research reporting. That is a major contribution to tobacco document research (TDR) methodology.

    While discussing possible lessons from historical research to TDR Carter mentions the interpretation of facts. Occasionally the difficulty with TDR lies in establishing the facts (e.g. if plans were implemented). One me...

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  • Thailand's Point of Sale Ban Complete
    Stephen L. Hamann

    Simon Chapman's pictures on page 367 of the latest Tobacco Control points out that the 7-11 chain of convenience stores in Thailand was refusing to cover their cigarette products as required by the Ministry of Health's requirements on advertising. They are now complying with the regulation and do not have the open display of cigarette products. This means that all retail shops in Thailand are no longer displaying any...

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  • Answering unjustified criticisms of my paper on smoking misclassification rates in Japanese women
    Peter N Lee

    Since my original publication in 1995 reporting high rates of denial of smoking in Japanese women,1 and Prof Yano's alternative assessment of the evidence,2 there has been an ongoing correspondence between the two of us.3-6 In his latest letter6 Yano asks whether my paper1 should have been published because it suffers from "erroneous interpretations based on invalid measurements."

    My calculations critically depe...

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  • Re: The Cost of Recruitment
    Anita Lal

    Nathan K Cobb raises an important point. This paper has been reviewed by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination [1], which provides critical assessments of the quality of economic evaluations. They raised this issue along with some other noteworthy points relating to the costs of the program. Specifically, the costs and the quantities were not reported separately, which limits the generalisability of the authors' results...

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  • Smokers who use oral snuff – are they non-smokers?
    Paul Nordgren

    In the latest issue of Tobacco Control, Radu and others report on tobacco use among Swedish schoolchildren (Tobacco Control 2005;14:405- 408). As a Swede, I was surprised to read about some of their findings.

    Children who smoke daily or almost daily are defined as “regular smokers”. The percentage of regular smokers is reported to have decreased to 4 per cent among 16-years-old boys and 15 per cent among girls by...

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  • Changes in Catalan smoking: A brief outsiders view
    Noeline M Holt

    In a visit to Catalonia in Spain during October 2005, I noticed a number of changes in the smoking culture and regulations, compared to a visit in 2001.

    Smokefree legislation is expected to be passed in 2006. The Catalonia regional government plans to take up the same tough stance as Ireland, the Netherlands and Norway. But there are already changes in Catalonia.

    In comparison to 2001, I came across sev...

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  • Patti Lynn

    Dear Editor,

    When we received the August 2005 issue of Tobacco Control, we found much in it to help inform our work, as usual.

    I am writing, however, because we have some concerns about one of the articles published. “The perimetric boycott: a tool for tobacco control advocacy,” is described as a comprehensive analysis of a number of boycotts, including one organized by Infact (now Corporate Accountabi...

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  • Is NRT loosing its efficacy?
    John R Hughes

    The recent article by Al-Delaimy et al (TC 14:359) makes two conclusions. The first is that use of over-the-counter (OTC) nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) for reasons other than smoking cessation is uncommon. This result is consistent with several other studies not cited in this letter (Nic Tobacco Research 6:79; Nicotine Safety and Toxicity (N Benowitz, ed) p 147). The second conclusion is that "some smokers may be...

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  • Japan made a great progress in tobacco control.
    Yoshitaka Kiriake

    When Hong and Bero published their study �"How the tobacco industry responded to an influential study of the health effects of secondhand smoke�" in 2002, I was supporting the law suit against a railway company to get smoke-free environment for workers and passengers in Japan. At that time, non-smokers had been annoyed by secondhand smoke for a long time regardless of our many claims. The company had been denying the harmfu...

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  • Should a paper with erroneous interpretations based on invalid measurements be published?
    Eiji Yano

                

    ...

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  • Status correction - W D E Irwin
    William D Irwin

    I am the “WDE Irwin” quoted on page 67 as follows: “Years later (1985), WDE Irwin, a technician with BAT in England, was asked how a grooved filter could be made that would avoid criticism but also provide good taste. He concluded: ‘Finally for cigarettes, I believe it to be a self evident truth not only is there no smoke without fire, but also there is no kick without smoke.’”

    “Technician” is not a correct id...

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  • Polymorphisms of genes involved in metabolism of cigarette smoke compounds, and health consequences
    Mostafa Saadat

    To the Editor,

    I read with great interest the article by Bjartveit and Tverdal (2005), who investigated health consequences of smoking 1-4 cigarettes per day. They found that in both sexes, smoking 1-4 cigarettes per day was associated with a significantly higher risk of dying from ischaemic heart disease and from all causes, and in women, from lung cancer [1]. Genetic studies suggest that all stages of tobacco...

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  • Authors' response to Dr Graham F Cope
    Kjell Bjartveit

    Dear Editor,

    We thank Dr Graham F Cope for his valuable remarks, and agree that underreporting of daily cigarette consumption might be of importance when assessing the risk in light smokers.[1]

    Dr Cope refers to two papers: a cross-sectional randomised study on smoking reduction in pregnant women, and an assessment of smoking status in patients with peripheral arterial disease.[2][3] Our study did not conc...

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  • Health consequences of smoking 1-4 cigarettes per day
    Dr Graham F. Cope

    I read the paper by Bjartveit and Tverdal with a great deal of interest(1). I welcome the fact that highlighting smoking, even a small number of cigarettes has a significant effect on ischaemic heart disease. However, these findings should be considered with a certain amount of scepticism, as the findings are based entirely on self-reported smoking habit. Biochemically validated research, both by ourselves(2), and other...

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  • Watch it BAT(Nigeria) Limited: the days of ignorance are over
    Olanrewaju Olusola Onigbogi

    British American Tobacco (Nigeria) Limited (BAT) and their cohorts the world over should come to terms with the fact that the truth cannot be hidden forever even from the man on the streets.

    Mr Kehinde Johnson did not need to comment at all because there was nothing to comment about! He should have apologised for being a part of this systematic elimination of defenceless people the world over.

    Dr. Chri...

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  • Response to E Yano and S Chapman
    Peter N Lee

    Response to E Yano and S Chapman

    P N Lee

    Professor Eiji Yano raises a number of issues in his letter(1) which responded to my commentary(2) on his article(3) about the Japanese spousal study, as does Chapman in his editorial(4). Here I reply to the main points raised.

    INTERPRETATION OF THE DATA

    Studies of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure and lung cancer commonly identify a...

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  • Time for society to redefine "reasonable"
    John R. Polito

    An excellent PM documents review! Thanks!

    Allowing the tobacco industry to define "reasonable regulation," an industry whose economic survival will always depend upon finding new and creative ways to entice children and teens into permanent chemical enslavement, is like allowing Hitler to write health standards for dead camps.

    While awaiting fine-tuning of FDA regulatory bills, it's time for the U....

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  • Who governs tobacco?
    Stephen L Hamann

    I enjoyed Derek Yach’s editorial. I believe that the FCTC and new research that will support its transnational aspects can make a big difference. But will they?

    I would warn against over optimism and for an understanding of the commitment and sustained action that will be required. First, one must face the fact that the primary governance of tobacco issues has been and continues to be located in the tobacco...

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  • Erratum
    Stanton A Glantz

    Erratum to Mandel, L; BC Alamar; and SA Glantz, “Smokefree Law did not affect revenue from gaming in Delaware” Tobacco Control 14 (2005), 10-12.


    The results in the original publication reflect a data entry error. The revised table in this erratum present the results with this error corrected. Using the corrected data, White's test for heteroskedasticity rejected homoskedasticity (p = 0.016) in t...

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  • Correction
    Pamela M Ling

    We would like to correct reference #68 in this article. The correct reference for the document is:

    Brown and Willamson. (1980). No Title. Bates No. 544000497/544000504. http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/tid/mgh10f00.

  • Stress and smoking among rural women in Maine: the need for counter-advertising
    Kathleen J. Welch, Ph.D., MPH

    In their article, Anderson, Glantz and Ling explore messages of psychosocial needs satisfaction in cigarette advertising targeting women. We agree with the authors that counter-advertising should attempt to “expose and undermine the needs satisfaction messages of cigarette advertising”. They mention that “a message of escape from life’s hassles could be countered with a message that addiction further complicates an al...

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  • Still A Cannibal In Our Midst!
    Ugochukwu Ejinkeonye

    In June 2002, months before this column was published, I published an essay in a number of Nigerian newspapers entitled: "The 17 Billion Poison House In Ibadan." The piece was my own way of pouring out my spilling disgust and accumulated indignation because of reports in the media earlier in April of the same year that the Obasanjo Administration had celebratorily granted permission to a so-called "leading cigarette comp...

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  • RE : "tobacco use is risky but counterfeit cigarettes are lethal"
    Ms. Véronique Leclézio

    To: BAT Nigeria Limited Mr. Kehinde Johnson Corporate & Regulatory Affairs Director

    "Should we swallow a bait and have a lethal hook thrust in our throats just because the bait looked so appealingly delicious? What the tobacco companies manufacture has no single benefit, no redeeming feature. All it does is to kill and ruin .They are unwanted, loathsome and unwelcome "(Ugochukwu D. Ejinkeonye- The Black Busi...

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  • Who dominates the illegal cigarette industry?
    Manjari Peiris

    Tobacco leaves which are used for manufacturing cigarettes are cultivated by the tobacco industry themselves, throughout the world.

    If the tobacco industry is honestly keen in stopping the availability of counterfeit cigarettes on this earth, they should first of all stop cultivating tobacco leaves. One of the strategies that the industry employs to protect their business is to misuse the illicit cigarette in...

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  • The slippery slope is not so slippery
    Simon Chapman

    Ron Davis finds my analogy weak when I liken employers not hiring smokers (because as a class they take more time off work) to not hiring women of child-bearing age (because they may become pregnant or take time off for childcare). He notes that in the USA (as indeed in many nations) there are laws outlawing labour discrimination on the basis of sex or age, but not discrimination based on smoking status. Some nations also...

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  • Response to BAT
    Babalola Faseru

    Dear Mr Kehinde Johnson,

    It's so sad that you have joined your CEO to pretend not to know the facts here.

    The products you produce in your factory are extremely poisonous apart from being addictive. All tobacco products irrespective of where they are coming from contain considerable quantities of nicotine and alkaloids. It has also been proven that tobacco from low or high yield cigarettes contain the sam...

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  • Open letter to British American Tobacco & BAT Nigeria
    Stan Shatenstein

    Kehinde Johnson, Corporate & Regulatory Affairs Director, British American Tobacco (Nigeria) Limited, writing on behalf of Dr. Chris Proctor, of BAT's UK headquarters, fails to respond to the principal questions asked by Professor Simon Chapman of the University of Sydney and editor of the journal Tobacco Control.

    In his posting to Tobacco Control's e-letters page, Mr. Johnson relies heavily on the judgment o...

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  • Re: Response from BAT Nigeria
    Jeffrey S. Wigand

    BAT Nigeria Limited Mr. Kehinde Johnson Corporate & Regulatory Affairs Director

    Re: Risky v. Lethal Cigarettes

    Mr Johnson:

    I am the former Vice President of R&D of one of your sister companies.

    I read your response to Professor Chapman on the issue that counterfeit cigarettes are lethal, whereas genuine brands that you manufacture under controlled supervision are only "risky". Are you i...

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  • Emotions for sale
    Norbert Hirschhorn

    To the excellent article by Bero, Glantz and Ling one may add the classical observation of RE Thornton of BAT about women's smoking behavior (1):

    "[G]iven that women are more neurotic than men it seems reasonable to assume that they will react more strongly to smoking and health pressures.... [T]here may be a case for launching a female oriented cigarette with relatively high deliveries of nicotine...."

    ...

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  • Response from BAT Nigeria
    Kehinde Johnson

    Dear Professor Chapman

    I am responding to your email to Dr. Chris Proctor concerning media remarks attributed to Richard Hodgson, Managing Director of British American Tobacco Nigeria that, "tobacco use is risky but counterfeit cigarettes are lethal" which was published in ThisDay of January 16 2005

    The Standards Organisation of Nigeria (SON) is the regulatory body focusing on tobacco control in Nigeria,...

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  • Ethical leadership for a smokefree generation
    Stephen L. Hamann

    I believe that colleges and universities must provide ethical leadership in research development, implementation, reporting and funding (not accept tobacco industry research money or researchers that do). They should not support tobacco industry investment or funding for institutions, seminars or fiduciary requirements. Any and all tobacco industry cooperation or collaboration is irresponsible because of the underlying...

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  • Nigerian Cover (April 2005)
    Simon Chapman

    On Jan 19 2005, having been alerted to the extraordinary statement shown on the cover of this issue of the journal (April 2005), I emailed the letter below to Dr Chris Proctor at BAT in the UK. He replied the next day asking when I would need the information sought. I replied immediately that I would like it within a week. No further response has ever been received from Dr Proctor.

    I invite him here publicly to n...

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  • A Middle Ground: Don't Condone or Condemn, But Let Employers Decide
    Ronald M Davis

    My position in this debate, which has been a difficult one for the tobacco control community, is that I neither condone nor condemn hiring policies that favor non-smokers. However, I do support the employer's right to adopt such a policy if the employer so chooses. I believe this position—which is intermediate between the opposing views espoused by Nigel Gray and Simon Chapman—is the most appropriate and defensible po...

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  • Recall - recognition
    Raymond C Pettit

    Thank you for your well done study.

    I had a question about your measure of recall, which in effect requires the ability to think abstractly and verbalize to in fact 'prove' to the interviewer that the ad and its message were seen, heard, and 'digested'.

    Our organization in NY, the Advertising Research Foundation, which may not be familiar to you, has embarked on a series of studies about the role tha...

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  • Why does press ignore these results?
    Manfred A Neuberger

    The highest nicotine concentrations of this study have been found in Austria. Some background for this is given by http://tc.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/14/1/3. Most amazing, however, was that these results had been presented to the Austrian press without causing a reaction. A study of Moshammer et al. (2004) Int.J.Hyg.Environ.Health 207, 4, 337-343 even showed high correlations of nicotine with active particle sur...

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  • General Comments
    Sylvanus L. Burney

    I have been a smoker for many years and have never attempted or had the desire to stop.

    I will willingly compare my health care costs with any non-smoker.

    I will challenge any non-smoker to match my absenteeism due to illness work record for the past 40 years.

    Editor's comment: I can introduce the writer to alcoholics who have never had a car crash; to 5 winners in every game of Russian roulette...

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  • Re: TC and the global tobacco epidemic
    Simon Chapman
    Wasim Maziak has concerns about the small number of papers published in the journal from less developed nations (LDCs) and urges that we send more LDC papers out for review and not reject them without review. The editors share his wish to see more papers in the journal from LDCs, but there are two problems. First, we don’t get very many submissions from LDCs, and second, like those submitted from authors in wealthy nations, we...
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  • TC and the global tobacco epidemic
    Wasim Maziak

    I start by expressing my earnest pride of Tobacco Control and the status it acquired in a record time. I am certainly grateful for making it access-free for developing countries. However, I have some reservation regarding TC editorial policy that I have mentioned before, and for which I want to provide my motivations, speaking only about research articles.

    Obviously the quest for quality cannot be debated and...

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  • Age Progression Software
    Lori Laury

    I have been looking for age progression software, do you have any suggestions on where I can purchase it?

  • Re: Possible involvement of Philip Morris statistical consultant in analysis of Enstrom/Kabat data
    PETER N LEE

    Dear Dr Hirschhorn,

    If you wish me to answer questions, it would seem more appropriate to write to me directly than to ask the questions in a journal without even drawing the existence of such a letter to my attention. However, I will explain the situation.

    I met Enstrom for the first time in 2000 at a meeting which Philip Morris organised in Richmond, Virginia. We both gave talks. One of his talks...

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  • Serious Errrors in this Study
    Kamal Chaouachi
    Dear Editor

    I have analysed the US-funded review and I want to share some of my findings. I am afraid there are serious errors in this document and I will quote only two of them to give an idea of their scope.

    ERRORS. “Waterpipe use likely increases the risk of bronchogenic carcinoma [68] as well as lung [16,20,69] oral,[8] and bladder [21,70] cancers.”

    I will not discuss each of all the cited references bec...

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  • Possible involvement of Philip Morris statistical consultant in analysis of Enstrom/Kabat data
    norbert hirschhorn

    The newly revived discussion of the Enstrom/Kabat California passive smoke study and conflict of interest led me to cite some addiional documents. The results of the study, as Bero et al show, were presented at a Philip Morris gathering, June 5-6 2000:

    http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/tid/urx85c00

    This seminar was part of WSA/INBIFO programming, viz. to "organize two-day seminar with Mr. Peter N. Lee an...

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  • Sponsorship
    Norbert Hirschhorn

    It should have been noted that the research for this topic was sponsored in part by the World Health Organization.

    Norbert Hirschhorn

  • Self-Criticism
    Rima Nakkash

    After reading Editor Chapman’s description of the efforts that he and other anti-tobacco activist colleagues went through to ensure that tobacco companies are not involved in events regarding corporate social responsibility, I was left with disenchanting thoughts. I recall a few months ago while surfing on the web for information regarding corporate social responsibility tactics of the tobacco industry, I came across info...

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  • Time to sue
    James Middleton

    the Philip Morris website admits the damage did and continues to do - they have to admit this given the massive amount of technical data available to prove this

    In the USA Big Tobacco has paid billions of dollars to settle lawsuits issued by different States and to pay for the healthcare to treat the effects of their product

    It is high time the HK Government filed a similar lawsuit or fear being sued it...

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  • Smoking in Movies is Up Compared to 1980s
    Stanton A Glantz

    Mekemson, et al. [1] present a thorough study of the presentation of smoking in the top 50 grossing movies each year from mid-1991 to mid-2001 that concludes that the levels of smoking was either constant or decreased slightly. (The small, but significant, drop with time they report may be the result of the fact that the smoking was much higher than average at their first data point, 1991-92, making it a leverage point).

    ...
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  • Taking a stance on industry CSR
    Doreen McIntyre

    Dear Norbert

    Thanks you for this excellent explanation of the reality behind tobacco companies' dabbling in so-called CSR programmes.

    Earlier this year INGCAT's member organisations agreed a position statment on tobacco industry CSR programmes that purport to address health and welfare issues, entitled "The socially responsible tobacco company - another misleading descriptor". The thrust of the positio...

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  • Excellent! Changes at Tobacco Control
    norbert hirschhorn

    Editor Chapman's report gives us great courage that the written word is in the end the most powerful tool for change, truth and enlightenment.

    We know too from tobacco industry documents that some of the closest readers of TC are the executives of those companies.

    Kudos and congratulations to the editorial team at TC.

    Norbert Hirschhorn MD

  • Multilevel models of schools' influence on pupils' smoking
    Paul Aveyard

    Pokorny et al show that one must use a multilevel model to accurately identify contextual influences, such as school characteristics, on the behaviour of individuals. Neither aggregate models nor individual level only models will be accurate(1). This is a good point well made.

    Unfortunately, Pokorny et al use aggregated school level perceived prevalence of smoking among peers as their contextual example variabl...

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  • Wrong-minded approach
    Larry Arslanian

    We have, as addiction scientists, as a goal, the desire to minimize addictive behaviors and thereby reduce negative outcomes and consequences. The AMA has this admirable goal in mind but their stated approach is not likely to get them there. Reducing nicotine in cigarettes has already been plainly demonstrated to increase tar and CO levels in smokers. We need to accept this and move in the correct direction, understanding...

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  • Still Smoking Today
    Hannah S. Pickworth

    The author of this artice says, "These classic children's books were first published in times when smoking was not widely acknowledged as harmful and a smoking adult male was one of the sex stereotypes". While this is true for the books cited, I have been looking for children's picture books with smokers in the illustrations for several years and am surprised how many current books as well as how many other older book...

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  • Links between tobacco industry and UK casino company
    Paul Pilkington

    Dear Editor,

    I was interested to note the links between the tobacco and gambling industries outlined by Mandel and Glantz.(1)

    I have recently discovered that at least one UK casino company is working with Healthy Buildings International (HBI), the indoor air quality consultancy firm part-funded by the Philip Morris tobacco company.(2) Previous research has demonstrated how the tobacco industry has used...

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  • Might smoking compromise the capacity for metabolic compensation in acute reductive stress?
    Richard G Fiddian-Green

    If blood lipid profile improves and weight increases with smoking cessation (1) smoking might be causally related to both the development of an abnormal blood lipid profile and the avoidance of weight gain or even weight loss. How then might smoking have increased the risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction in this study (2)? By reducing the capacity to respond to reductive stress with a further increase in the degree of...

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  • How do you know this wont make things even worse? (updated)
    Clive Bates
    It's a relief to see the authors backing away from the previously advocated "remove-the-nicotine" approach to regulating cigarettes. This was a strategy that would surely have killed millions more as toxin-to-nicotine ratios worsened during a phase-out, while smokers continued to seek their established satisfactory nicotine dose. Making even dirtier delivery systems for nicotine was never the greatest public health idea, and no...
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  • The Cost of Recruitment
    Nathan K Cobb

    McAlister and his co-authors make an extremely valuable contribution to the ongoing debates of health care costs in the form of their estimate of the cost efficacy of a telephone quit line. The publication of this data should provide new evidence to convince payors to cover cessation.

    However, since recruitment costs were excluded, it is difficult to make broader public health decisions based on these estimates....

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  • Flight Attendants' role in success of smoking ban
    Charles Levenstein

    Dear Editor,

    I am writing in response to the research paper, “Clearing the airways: advocacy and regulation for smoke-free airlines” by Holm and Davis, published in the March supplement of Tobacco Control, 2004. While Holm and Davis present an apparently comprehensive narrative of the events that lead to the legislative prohibition of smoking in aircraft cabins, one is left with the sense from their research of...

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  • Smoking cessation in curricula- the challenges are linked to health promotion
    Ann M Wylie

    I have recently completed a doctoral thesis exploring the epistemological challenges associated with the inclusion of health promotion in medical undergraduate education.

    Those challenges reflect the dilemmas associated with teaching about smoking cessation. It is in fact only recently that the UK NHS plan has suggested a consistent approach for the delivery of smoking cessation services and previous to that th...

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  • The subsequent response?
    Clive D Bates

    In their e-letter of 19 December 2003, Tomar et al promised that "Many of the specific comments of Foulds et al. will be addressed in a subsequent response". No response has since been forthcoming.

    Given that Tomar et al's contribution managed to avoid peer review and to appear in the paper edition of Tobacco Control as apparently the last word on the subject, I think it is beholden upon them to say what they...

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  • “No smoking” areas in restaurants are not sufficient
    Hanns Moshammer

    Sir, I read with interest the paper by Cains et al. (2004) on the effect of “no smoking” areas in licensed clubs in the metropolitan area of Sydney. They found only an insufficient effect of “no smoking” zones especially when this was only a subsection of the whole room without separation. In spite of this finding this poor protection of the non-smokers is still much favoured in the hospitality industry around the world. T...

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  • Minimal Training in Tobacco-Control May be Epidemic
    Melbourne F Hovell, Ph.D., M.P.H.

    The findings presented by Roddy et al. [1] paint a dim picture of tobacco training in the UK, but rosier than that in U.S. schools of public health (SPH).

    As part of the Association of Schools of Public Health(ASPH)/American Legacy Foundation “STEP UP” initiative, we administered an ASPH survey to the 27 faculty members of the San Diego State University Graduate School of Public Health (SDSU GSPH) and also to...

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  • Partial protection provided by "no smoking" areas may be over-estimated
    Pascal A. Diethelm

    Cains et al., studying the extent to which designated "no smoking" areas provide protection from environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), conclude that such areas achieve some reduction in the level of exposure of individuals to ETS. They indicate an average 53% reduction in nicotine levels and 52% reduction in PM10 levels. These numbers, although not marginal, are not sufficient to provide an adequate level of protection....

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  • Update on a Secondhand-Smoke Lawsuit
    Edward L Sweda

    On 24 February 2004, the United States Supreme Court, by a vote of 6 to 2, affirmed the judgment of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in Olympic Airways v. Husain, a case mentioned in this article under the heading "Negligence." With no other avenue of appeal, Olympic Airways is now required to pay $1.4 million to the Estate of Dr. Abid Hanson because of its negligence.

    Dr. Hanson's tragic death...

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  • Teaching Medical Students to take tobacco use seriously
    Stephen L. Hamann

    I always enjoy new research describing how medical students are not taught about tobacco use and smoking cessation. I teach medical students about tobacco use. One of the first things I teach students about tobacco use is that it is best considered a disease, not a risk factor. In the American Society of Addiction Medicine's Public Policy Statement on Nicotine Dependence and Tobacco in the Journal of Addictive Disease,...

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  • Evidence and argument over smokeless tobacco – another response to Tomar et al
    Clive Bates

    I think the most important point to address in Tomar et al’s e-response [1] is their call for more evidence before any change to the status quo (the status quo is a ban on oral tobacco in the EU, and public health disinformation in the US). They say that “neither we nor the IOM Report are ready to accept extant data as sufficient for endorsing smokeless tobacco for harm reduction”. This stance does not reflect the real...

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  • SMOKING IN PREGNANCY: A BIGGER PROBLEM THAN YOU THINK: SELF-UNDERREPORTING & LOW LEVEL OF SUSPICION
    Krzysztof M. Kuczkowski

    I read with interest the recent article by Graham and Owen (1), which explores the socioeconomic differentials in underreporting of smoking during pregnancy. The authors are to be congratulated for preparing such an interesting, thought-provoking, and timely study on this subject. However, it seems important to emphasize that in addition to self- underreporting (or denial) of smoking status in pregnancy the problem also li...

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  • A Reply to Bates et al. and Foulds et al.
    Scott L. Tomar

    An important discussion of issues is being missed in a rash of name calling. Let’s back up, recognize our common goals and see if we can discuss issues and skip the personalities. We believe that the letters of Foulds et al and Bates et al badly mangled our comments and took statements out of context. Foulds et al. and Bates et al. obviously feel the same about our article. This issue has precipitated name calling, qu...

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