Table 6 Estimated 6-month prevalence of cessation attempts among adolescent smokers according to level of cigarette consumption* and period of adolescence
Country, study yearAge/grade rangeDefinition of cessation in the past 6 monthsPrevalence (%) (95% CI)
Any use (in the past month)
Early to middle adolescence
Canada, 199437Age 10–14Tried to quit41†
65‡
22§
United States, 198975Age 12–13Made at least one serious attempt to quit smoking cigarettes73 (67 to 78)‡||
Middle adolescence
United States, 198975Age 14–15Made at least one serious attempt to quit smoking cigarettes68 (66 to 72)‡||
Early to late adolescence
Canada, 199437Age 10–19Tried to quit44†
48‡†
33§†
United States, 198975Age 12–18Made at least one serious attempt to quit smoking cigarettes57 (56 to 59)‡†||
Middle to late adolescence
Canada, 199437Age 15–19Tried to quit45†
44‡
52§
Late adolescence
United States, 198975Age 16–18Made at least one serious attempt to quit smoking cigarettes52 (50 to 54)‡||
Daily use (in the past week)
Early to middle adolescence
Canada, 200270Grade 5–9Tried to quit57
Daily use (in the past month)
Early to middle adolescence
Canada, 199437Age 10–14Tried to quit64‡¶**
Early to late adolescence
Canada, 199437Age 10–19Tried to quit41‡†¶**
United States, 198930Age 12–19Tried to quit52 (<10 cigarettes per day)‡
49 (⩾10 cigarettes per day)‡
Middle to late adolescence
Canada, 199437Age 15–19Tried to quit38‡¶**
Non-daily use (in the past month)
Early to middle adolescence
Canada, 199437Age 10–14Tried to quit65‡¶
Early to late adolescence
Canada, 199437Age 10–19Tried to quit62‡†¶
Middle to late adolescence
Canada, 199437Age 15–19Tried to quit60‡¶
  • *Any use in the past month was defined operationally as “smoked ⩾1 cigarette in the past 30 days”; daily use in the past week was defined operationally as: “smoked cigarettes on each of the 7 days preceding data collection”; daily use in the past month was defined operationally as: “smoked⩾1 cigarette each day in the past 30 days”; non-daily use in the past month was defined operationally as: “smoked ⩾1 cigarette in the past 30 days, but not daily”.

  • †Excluded from the calculation of summary estimate because complete stratum-specific estimates were available for this study.

  • ‡Estimated among the subgroup of adolescents who had smoked ⩾100 cigarettes in their lifetime.

  • §Estimated among the subgroup of adolescents who had smoked <100 cigarettes in their lifetime.

  • ||Three reports30 74 75 were based on the 1989 US Teenage Attitudes and Practices Survey. When estimates for duplicate age and/or smoking history strata were available, only Moss et al75 was considered in the calculation of summary estimates. Estimates of the 6-month prevalence of cessation attempts among adolescents reporting any use in the past month for duplicate age strata were as follows: 65 and 55 among 12–18 year olds as reported by Allen et al74 and Zhu et al,30 respectively; 80 among 12–13 year olds as reported by Allen et al;74 75 among 14–15 year olds as reported by Allen et al;74 and 60 among 16–18 year olds as reported by Allen et al.74

  • ¶Estimate was derived by multiplying the proportion who ever tried to quit by the proportion of ever quitters who tried to quit in the past 6 months.

  • **Additional data were reported on the 6-month cessation attempt prevalence according to the frequency of daily consumption among adolescents who had consumed ⩾100 cigarettes in their lifetime and who had ever tried to quit smoking, as follows: age 10–14: 83 (1–5 cigarettes per day), 73 (6–10 cigarettes per day), 68 (11–15 cigarettes per day), 77 (16–20 cigarettes per day), 84 (⩾25 cigarettes per day); age 15–19: 70 (1–5 cigarettes per day, 60 (6–10 cigarettes per day), 49 (11–15 cigarettes per day), 33 (16–20 cigarettes per day), 46 (21–25 cigarettes per day); age 10–19: 75 (1–5 cigarettes per day), 63 (6–10 cigarettes per day), 52 (11–15 cigarettes per day), 40 (16–20 cigarettes per day), 50 (21–25 cigarettes per day), 68 (⩾25 cigarettes per day).