Table 1

Associations between exposure to tobacco coupons in the past 30 days, beliefs about tobacco, susceptibility to cigarette smoking, cessation belief and intention to purchase cigarettes, 2012 US NYTS

Never smokersExperimentersCurrent smokers
Variables% among those exposed% among those not exposed (ref.)AOR (95% CI)% among those exposed% among those not exposed (ref.)AOR (95% CI)% among those exposed% among those not exposed (ref.)AOR (95% CI)
Beliefs about tobacco
 Denied that smoking cigarettes makes young people look cool or fit in (n=23 931)68.281.80.54 (0.46 to 0.64)54.765.10.69 (0.50 to 0.95)39.350.70.65 (0.51 to 0.82)
 Denied that young people who smoke cigarettes have more friends (n=23 834)41.652.80.78 (0.67 to 0.91)31.639.70.80 (0.61 to 1.04)27.331.50.77 (0.57 to 1.02)
 Agreed that all tobacco products are dangerous (n=23 532)66.673.50.79 (0.66 to 0.94)52.953.51.05 (0.77 to 1.43)30.633.60.99 (0.82 to 1.21)
Susceptible to cigarette smoking (n=17 823)43.626.11.90 (1.65 to 2.19)
Cessation belief
 Felt likely to succeed in quitting cigarettes for good (n=1900)68.184.70.37 (0.29 to 0.48)
Reported likely to purchase cigarettes in the next 30 days (n=6025)6.43.02.07 (1.22 to 3.52)69.445.43.09 (2.38 to 4.00)
  • AOR, Adjusted OR; NYST, National Youth Tobacco Survey.

  • The associations between each variable and receipt of tobacco coupons were estimated in separate models, adjusting for age, gender, race, living with tobacco users, and exposure to tobacco advertising through the internet, magazines and newspapers, billboards, point of sale, and exposure to smoking images in television and movies. Bolded estimates are statistically significant (p<0.05).