Table 2

Association between improvement in smoking during lockdown (quitting smoking or reducing the number of cigarettes smoked per day) and selected individual variables (base model), conditions during lockdown and psychological variables: distribution at baseline (N), proportion of people improving their smoking habit (%) and corresponding ORs* with 95% CIs

VariableCurrent smokers
N
People who quit smoking during lockdownPeople who reduced smoking during lockdown
%OR (95% CI)%OR (95% CI)
Total14008.615.0
Gender
 Male7249.0116.51
 Female6778.20.95 (0.60 to 1.52)13.30.83 (0.57 to 1.22)
Age
 55–744826.1113.51
 35–545887.51.01 (0.57 to 1.78)11.40.85 (0.54 to 1.33)
 18–3433114.31.92 (1.07 to 3.45)23.42.14 (1.33 to 3.46)
Education
 Low2607.5116.71
 Intermediate6917.10.96 (0.47 to 1.97)15.10.94 (0.54 to 1.61)
 High45011.51.52 (0.74 to 3.12)13.70.85 (0.47 to 1.52)
Living with children aged 0–14
 No9378.21151
 Yes4649.31.05 (0.63 to 1.74)151.07 (0.7 to 1.64)
Geographic area
 North6478.2116.91
 Centre2876.60.81 (0.44 to 1.51)13.20.77 (0.47 to 1.28)
 South and Islands46710.41.24 (0.74 to 2.08)13.40.80 (0.52 to 1.25)
Number of cigarettes smoked per day
 >152824.8111.42.07 (1.17 to 3.64)
 6–157235.10.99 (0.49 to 1.97)15.51.59 (0.96 to 2.63)
 ≤539517.73.55 (1.82 to 6.93)18.71
Working condition during lockdown
 Regularly working2097.1111.61
 Working from home3929.31.10 (0.44 to 2.71)11.51.06 (0.58 to 1.92)
 Unemployed before lockdown4737.51.18 (0.48 to 2.88)17.51.93 (1.02 to 3.64)
 Job lost32710.31.59 (0.65 to 3.91)17.51.51 (0.82 to 2.81)
People per room
 ≤111098.9113.61
 >12917.50.76 (0.41 to 1.42)20.31.71 (1.02 to 2.84)
Decreased quality of life
 No4699.3113.71
 Yes9328.30.87 (0.53 to 1.43)15.61.15 (0.75 to 1.77)
Decreased amount of sleep
 No9258.4115.31
 Yes4759.11.11 (0.68 to 1.79)14.40.94 (0.64 to 1.39)
Increased anxiety
 No7489.9114.91
 Yes6537.20.67 (0.42 to 1.08)150.99 (0.68 to 1.44)
Increased depression
 No6889.1115.31
 Yes7128.10.85 (0.54 to 1.35)14.60.96 (0.65 to 1.41)
  • *ORs and corresponding 95% CIs were estimated through unconditional multiple logistic regression models after adjustment for gender, age, education, living with children aged 0–14, geographic area and number of cigarettes smoked per day. Estimates in bold are statistically significant at 0.05 level.